Kyocera M6526cidn & Scan to Folder & SMB Shares on MacOS El Capitan Server

After Upgrading to El Capitan, my Kyocera MFC didn’t want to save scans via SMB connection anymore. This brought me to google wildly after any solution, and I came across these documents, which kept enlightening me:

As I had set up a user named „scanuser“ in the Mac OS Server App, I kept looking there, why it wouldn’t work. I changed permission rights and even switched the system back to SMB v1, by entering the following in a console window:

echo "[default]" >> ~/Library/Preferences/nsmb.conf; echo "smb_neg=smb1_only" >> ~/Library/Preferences/nsmb.conf

If you need to change it back, you just enter:

rm ~/Library/Preferences/nsmb.conf

But, to no avail!

So I looked into System Preferences and Users again and thought, I might create a local user called „scanuser“. This I did, and suddenly my Kyocera printer & scanner was willing to talk to the SMB share on my Mac OS Server again.

Traffic Attack from Baidu Address Space

Yesterday I noticed that one of my servers was seeing more traffic than usual. The hourly traffic limit I had set was reached and my mailbox filled with traffic warning messages. I wanted to look into the matter but wondered: how can I quickly see which IP connections exist? Fortunate to be on a Debian Linux, I decided to install the package iptraf. This IP LAN monitor generates various network statistics and showed me that most of the new connections came from one particular IP range: 180.76.0.0/16. WHOIS DB shows, that this range belongs to BAIDU, the famous search enterprise in China. Generating several hundred Megabytes of traffic per hour was too much for me. You can see the traffic line here:

Graph showing the Baidu Traffic Attack
Start of the Baidu traffic phenomenon
Graph showing the Baidu Traffic Attack
Trying to counter the Baidu traffic phenomenon.

First of all I thought it might be the indexing work of many Baidu spiders, or of spiders claiming to be Baidu. In this regard, I found a very helpful post by the folks at Perishablepress, which explains how to block the Baidu spidering process through the .htaccess file.

This did not really solve the problem, so I took more serious measures and blocked the whole address space of Baidu via iptables Firewall. This is the command you need (please be root before using it):

iptables -A INPUT -s 180.76.0.0/16 -j DROP

Just remember, that this statement really blocks all the traffic from the Baidu network. So if your servers are meant to reach Chinese visitors, you might want to think twice before you block it all!

Movable Type goes WordPress

Finally: Jahrelang lief auf meinem Root-Server bei IBH halb versteckt der Blog Äppeltexte auf einer Installation von Movable Type. Da es MT ja nicht mehr als OpenSource gibt, ist eine WordPress-Installation das naheliegendste. Daher heute Abend mal fix die Installation angeworfen, die wirklich supereinfach auf einem Debian GNU/Jessie durchzuführen ist. Dann half Google weiter, um etwas über die Migration von Movable Type zu WordPress nachzulesen. Ich empfehle den Beitrag Importing from Movable Type to WordPress. Jetzt freue ich mich, hier auf WordPress-Basis weiterbloggen zu können!